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Thursday, October 21, 2021

#12 Inflation and Cryptocurrency, The Deep Mind of AOC, MO Social Services on Missing Foster Kids

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(YAHOO) Cargo ships anchored near Los Angeles and New York ports face a 4-week delay to dock, raising further fears over the global supply chain
Last week, around 24 cargo ships and oil tankers were reported to be stuck waiting to dock off the coast of Long Island, New York. Insider previously reported that 56 container ships were stuck at anchor or in drift areas off of Los Angeles and Long Beach ports.

With record numbers of huge cargo ships stuck at key ports, consumers could face a shortage of items, including clothing, electronics, toys, and furniture, according to The Daily Mail.

“Global infrastructure was not designed to handle goods at such a rate,” a logistics expert who spoke anonymously, told the outlet.

  • Dozens of cargo ships waiting at US ports face weeks of delays to unload, The Daily Mail reported.
  • The delay comes amid surging demand for goods and the ongoing impact of the labor shortage.
  • Congested ports have raised concerns about shortages in the months ahead of Christmas.

(MEAW) To end systemic racism, Minnesota school removes F grade and allows retests
Western Washington University made headlines in late September for becoming the latest institution to adopt affinity housing, a separate floor for Black students. In February, a New York school went viral for asking parents to reflect on their whiteness in pamphlets. We also reported in April on the worries a Portland school was having on picking a mascot because it could be perceived as racist.

That brings us to the Sunrise Park School. The plan to remove F grades isn’t the first time the school has made the news. Back in March, the school ran an activity where it asked students to “assess their own level of privilege.” As he did then, the district’s superintendent Wayne Kazmierczak has been forced to defend the move. 

Kazmierczak certainly believes so, even though there doesn’t appear to be much proof of the idea. “Grading can be one of the largest areas in which systemic racism and inequities are perpetuated,” the school district’s website said. He added that “grading should not be a behavior punishment and should not be a measure of how well a student can survive stress at home,” but rather be “a measure of what a student knows and has mastered in.”

(NEWSMAX) Fed Judge Questions Whether Jan. 6 Rioters Are Treated Unfairly Compared With George Floyd Protesters
Rejecting the recommendation of prosecutors, a federal judge sentenced a Jan. 6 rioter to probation on Friday.

The same judge also suggested that the Justice Department was being too hard on those who broke into the Capitol compared with the handling of those arrested during anti-racism protests following George Floyd’s murder.

U.S. District Court Judge Trevor McFadden questioned why federal prosecutors had not brought more cases against those accused in 2020 summertime protests, reading out statistics on riot cases in the nation’s capital that were not prosecuted.

“I think the U.S. attorney would have more credibility if it was even-handed in its concern about riots and mobs in this city,” McFadden said during Danielle Doyle’s sentencing for entering the Capitol on Jan. 6 with a throng of other rioters. Prosecutors recommended two months of home confinement.

The statements by McFadden, an appointee of former President Donald Trump, were a major departure from the other federal judges overseeing Jan. 6 cases so far, despite other Trump appointees on the court assigned to the hundreds of cases. They have generally discussed seriousness of the crime and its unique place in American history – different from other violent free speech protests because it sought to disrupt the peaceful transition of power.

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REP Madison Cawthorn -“This spending bill is America’s long form death certificate and you have endorsed it.’

(WASHINGTON POST) White House faces grueling choices as major cuts hang over Biden economic package
Sens. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) insist on trimming as much as $2 trillion 

Biden has pitched lawmakers on a compromise of as high as $2.3 trillion, but Manchin has said the legislation should consist of $1.5 trillion in new spending — a position that could slash the administration’s agenda by as much as 60 percent.

Economist Larry Summers, who served under presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, pointed to Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal as an example of “getting a lot of things started” and hoping the effective ones persist.

“The lesson of successful democracy is you plant a lot of seeds, and some of them grow really well and some of them don’t,” Summers said. “The New Deal was a lot of different programs, too.”

Oil could surge above $100 in the event of a cold winter – and spark inflation that drives the next macro crisis, BofA says

(WSJ) Dollar Tree to Sell9 More Items Above $1 as Costs Rise
Dollar Tree said it would start selling products at $1.25 and $1.50 or other prices slightly above $1 in some of its stores, expanding current tests selling items at higher price points as supply-chain snarls, a tight labor market and inflation push costs higher.

(WSJ) Walk-in Cryptocurrency Exchanges Emerge Amid Bitcoin Boo
Bricks-and-mortar crypto exchanges all operate slightly differently, but their basic premise is that customers can walk in off the street and purchase various cryptocurrencies with cash, a credit card or a bank transfer. The stores teach new customers how different digital currencies work and guide them through the process of setting up a digital wallet that the investor controls via an app. And when customers want to exchange their digital coins for local currency, the exchange counter can handle that for them.

(FOX) Squad’ member Cori Bush’s jewelry, dresses from constituents raise ethic ‘red flags,’ watchdog says
In a recent profile in Harpers Bazaar magazine, titled the “Might of Cori Bush,” Bush’s father said the Missouri Democrat regularly receives gifts from grateful constituents so she can “look her best” in Washington. 

“Throughout the general election, she posted videos of herself in the clothes she proudly wore: formfitting dresses, leggings, and tall boots,” reporter Kaitlyn Greenidge wrote in the profile. “Her father tells me that people in the neighborhood now regularly drop off dresses, jewelry and shoes for her to wear in Washington. ‘They say, ‘We want her to look her best. She’s representing us.'”https://7974d7536d254ebb3847fb20a8b9cb48.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

But a watchdog told Fox News that this scenario is problematic since ethics rules strictly prohibit House members from taking gifts valued at more than $50. 

(STLPD) Report: Missouri falling short on protecting foster children from going missing

In 2020, the agency, which employs about 2,000 people, had 26% turnover. Budget documents show the division was able to roll over $1.6 million from “increased turnover” of children’s service workers last year.

According to the report, Missouri officials said Department of Social Services employees cannot rely on the agency’s case management system to accurately identify children who are missing from foster care without reviewing individual case files.

LIBS OF TIKTOK

Liberal says that LIBS OF TIKTOK can’t handle the left exposing the hatred.
The Left.

TUCKER – ‘But because it’s 2021 and people think their cats’

Paul Curtman is a veteran of the U. S. Marine Corps, an author, conference speaker, and statesman. For nearly 20 years, Paul has helped lead and develop leaders in the United States military, public service sectors, and business. Paul is a strong advocate for personal and economic freedom as well as the strength and integrity of the free market system. He is a Fellow at Club for Growth in Washington D.C. and currently lives in Missouri with his wife, Ruth, and their four children.
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